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Re: derailleur v hub gears

01 August, 2011 01:58PM
For your information, our John O'Groats to Lands End trip was spread over 20 days of cycling averaging 52 miles per day and about 9.5 miles per hour overall. After the first week we found that we could comfortably do 35 or 40 miles before lunch, resulting in some leisure time in the afternoon. We organised it all ourselves, and stayed either in Youth Hostels or in B&B and carried only 3 changes of clothes - wash clothes every other day. By taking a slightly more direct route I reckon one could get the daily distance down to under 45 miles for the same amount of time. Alternatively if you are not constrained by holiday allowance at work then you could cut the daily mileage and take somewhat longer over the trip.

On the subject of Rohloff reliability, I've certainly spoken with cyclists who have been using such a hub for around 5 years without problems (scheduled maintenance is an oil change once per year); the bike shop I bought it from recommended it for reliability over an 8-speed hub. Internally it's actually a 7-speed system coupled to a 2-speed system, but externally you just have a single 14-notch twist shifter.

My derailleur gear system needed some minor tweeks in the first few months to get all the gear changes smooth; since then I've done many thousands of miles without problems or further adjustment - just regular lubrication and chain replacement.

With a derailleur system, I often think that the range of gears is more important than the number of gears. Particularly as I get older the bottom gear is the most important thing. If you just bought a derailleur-equipped bike off-the-shelf then it is quite possible that gears are more suited to a 25 year old than to a 70 year old. The easiest way to make all the gears lower is to replace the front chainrings and front derailleur mechanism. Count the number of teeth on each of the front chainrings; if they are 28-38-48 then you could consider replacing these either by 24-34-44 or even by 22-32-42. You could also count the number of teeth on the biggest (innermost) sprocket at the back wheel. If this is less than 34 then you could consider replacing the rear cogset to get a largest rear sprocket of either 34 or (going to extremes here) 36. If you are buying a new bike then the shop should be able to make these gearing changes for a relatively small charge.
Subject Author Posted

derailleur v hub gears

cyclepop 25 July, 2011 06:12PM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

cotterpin 26 July, 2011 03:10PM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

cyclepop 26 July, 2011 03:50PM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

cotterpin 26 July, 2011 06:44PM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

DocB 26 July, 2011 06:55PM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

cyclepop 26 July, 2011 07:44PM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

nicm 26 July, 2011 08:43PM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

cyclepop 27 July, 2011 08:42AM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

Murray R Langton 30 July, 2011 04:34PM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

cyclepop 01 August, 2011 10:28AM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

Murray R Langton 01 August, 2011 01:58PM

Re: derailleur v hub gears

single speed 22 August, 2011 07:59AM



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