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Re: bought the wrong bike?confused smiley

09 November, 2012 06:51PM
Extending an aheadset style stem/steerer combo isn't a particularly elegant arrangement. Better would be to change the stem for one with a steeper angle. This will *typically* have two effects, it firstly raises the handlebars in relation to the sadlle and secondly, it brigs shortens the effective "reach" (the distance between saddle and handlebars. These two effects combined will lift you up slightly at the front, reducing the amount you have to be bent forward. This should shift some of your weight back onto your bum/legs and off your hands.

If a steep/ hi-rise stem doesn't have the full desired effect, consider a higher rise pair of handlebars.

I assume the bike you have is the "Specialized Sirrus Elite". If so, it has a fairly low rise stem and flat handlebars.

Something possibly worth looking at though, without going to the expense of swapping gear out, it to look at how your hands are positioned on the bars. This is a little hard to describe but I'll try my best...

I've often seen bikes where the brake levers are set too high or too low for the rider. Ideally, on a straight bar bike, when you rest your hands on the bars with your fingers over the brake levers, there should be only a slight bend in your wrist, ie your hands should be inline with the rest of your arm. If the brake levers are too high, it pushes the fingers up, resulting in your weight being borne in the wrong place. Similarly, if the levers are too low your hand has to twist over the top of the bars to reach the levers, placing your weight too much onlt your thumb. Hold your arms directly out in front of you with your hands inline but fingers and thumb in a resting state. Your hands will ordinarily form a grip type stance as if you're holding a piece of wood. Now lower your arms without moving your wrists till your hands rest on the bars. The brake levers should sit nicely into that grip like stance. If they don't adjust the levers (typically easiet to do so by slackening the bolt(s) holding the bars into the stem) and rotate the bars until the levrs land naturally. Retighten and try riding again.

Grips are also a very personal choice. I've seen many so-called "ergonomic" grips which look highly uncomfortable, some of them forcing you to twist your wrist in or outward.

Ultimately, as Doc has already said, it is near impossible for us to pinpoint the specific reason for your discomfort without seeing you and your bike together in real life. I'd not worry too much about size though. If two people have independently said it's the right size bike, I'd go with their judgement. Setup however is an entirely different ballgame and you may need to tweak a number of the positions in order to finally find your comfort zone. Equally, it isn't outside the realms of possibility that your discomfort stems purely from being out of practise and that as you get used to your new bike, the discomfort will wain without any other intervention.

Good luck with it anyway :-)

p.s. haven't a clue what the +/- might be as I can't be certain which component you are referring to in your post.
Subject Author Posted

bought the wrong bike?confused smiley

stevep 09 November, 2012 03:17PM

Re: bought the wrong bike?confused smiley

DocB 09 November, 2012 03:44PM

Re: bought the wrong bike?confused smiley

stevep 09 November, 2012 04:21PM

Re: bought the wrong bike?confused smiley

stevep 09 November, 2012 05:31PM

Re: bought the wrong bike?confused smiley

DocB 09 November, 2012 06:34PM

Re: bought the wrong bike?confused smiley

siwatts 09 November, 2012 06:51PM

Re: bought the wrong bike?confused smiley

stevep 09 November, 2012 09:37PM

Re: bought the wrong bike?confused smiley

DocB 09 November, 2012 10:24PM



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