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14 January, 2013 11:43AM
Quote:
DocB
One thing that the introduction of the metric sizing did was to make the nomenclature more sensible and easier to understand. The first number ( e.g 700) is the wheel size and the second number ( e.g. 37) is the tyre width. So the difference between a tyre marked 700x37 and one marked 700x38 is mm difference in width and I would defy anybody to spot the difference by eye. I have never used the old imperial sizes and would have to look them up to find equivalents but I do know that it was nowhere near as simple.

In principal any 700 tyre would fit on any 700 rim but in practice rims tend to come in widths designed to take the narrower tyres used on road bikes and wider rims designed to take the wider tyres used on hybrids. For example you could drop down to something like a 700x28 on your bike if you wanted to. If you did this then you would get a harsher ride - there is less tyre height to cushion the ride - but would get less drag - there is less tyre on the road. Its a matter of personal preference.

Inner tubes expand to fit the size available and so any tube will fit a range of tyre sizes. There are limits. You could fit a tube designed for a 700 road bike (700x23) in your tyre but it would be a bit stretched and might bust through being over inflated.

The comment about compressors is a bit of backside covering by the tube manufacturer. It is very difficult to over inflate with a hand pump and if the tyre is not seated properly you will find out without the tube exploding because everything happens quite slowly. That is not the case with an air compressor. If you over inflate, or the tyre does not seat then you will find that out when there is an almighty bang as the tube bursts! Cautious use of an air compressor is quite sensible and to be recommended for anybody who struggles to get sufficient air into a tube with a conventional pump.

Second the admin mans comment on tube quality. I only fit the more expensive tubes because I do not want customers returning with "slow" punctures. Supermarket bikes are fitted with cheap tubes and they seem to need pumping up every five minutes. Fitting a decent tube solves that problem.


Many thanks for your very informative reply it made understanding these tubes much easier and more logical.

Its many years since i have been on the cycling scene and it is amazing how technical it has become since my early days.

Points on compressor were excellent,I do use a small compressor but with caution..makes life easier as you get older!!!

Regarding tubes would you be good enough to recommend a particular maker? I appreciate you only get what you pay for,but paying high prices doesnt always buy the tried and tested best,plus my circumstances will be light distances mainly on road or pathways
Subject Author Posted

Return to cycling baffled by inner tube size and selction.

caskin 12 January, 2013 12:49PM

Re: Return to cycling baffled by inner tube size and selction.

siwatts 12 January, 2013 04:22PM

Re: Return to cycling baffled by inner tube size and selction.

caskin 13 January, 2013 03:42PM

Re: Return to cycling baffled by inner tube size and selction.

DocB 14 January, 2013 08:03AM

Re: Return to cycling baffled by inner tube size and selction.

caskin 14 January, 2013 11:38AM

Re: Return to cycling baffled by inner tube size and selction.

caskin 14 January, 2013 11:43AM

Re: Return to cycling baffled by inner tube size and selction.

DocB 14 January, 2013 01:28PM

Re: Return to cycling baffled by inner tube size and selction.

caskin 14 January, 2013 04:45PM



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